Monsignor’s Message – Rosh Hashanah

Posted on Sep 14, 2017

This is a message from Msgr. Kieran Harrington, Vicar for Communications for the Diocese of Brooklyn that appears in The Tablet:

In the coming weeks our Jewish brothers and sisters will celebrate Rosh Hashanah. This marks the beginning of the Jewish New Year. The shofar will sound and soon the people of God will embark on ten days of penitence. It would be good for us to follow the example of our elder brothers and sisters in faith. In a real sense as summer ends, we too begin a new year. Parents and children are given an opportunity to begin anew. Parishes and parishioners all start anew. In a world that is self–indulgent, we can all begin with penance before we start anew.

May God bless you,
Monsignor Kieran Harrington, V.E.

Monsignor’s Message – Helping the Homeless

Posted on Aug 31, 2017

This is a message from Msgr. Kieran Harrington, Vicar for Communications for the Diocese of Brooklyn that appears in The Tablet:

We have all witnessed a burgeoning homeless crisis in our city. In fact, over the last ten years there are 76% more homeless people sleeping in NYC’s shelters. The crisis is approaching Depression-era levels. Many of those sleeping on the street are suffering from severe mental illness and other health problems. Many of us do not realize that there are 15,145 homeless families with 22,695 children sleeping in shelters. What can we do? As we approach the winter months, perhaps we can consider how we as a Church can help. Some parishes run programs to welcome the homeless for the night and provide meal. Underutilized properties can provide shelter for some of those in need. With our our time, we can support the work of Catholic Charities and similar charitable entities. them with a hot contributions and We can demand that our elected officials be accountable for failing to develop sound public policies to address the needs of these our brothers and sisters living on the margins of our city.

May God bless you,
Monsignor Kieran Harrington, V.E.

Monsignor’s Message – Hope

Posted on Aug 10, 2017

This is a message from Msgr. Kieran Harrington, Vicar for Communications for the Diocese of Brooklyn that appears in The Tablet:

Hope. Do I wish to be with God in Heaven? Do I believe that the Lord is assisting me with all that is necessary for me to be with Him in Heaven? This is at the crux of what we mean by hope. We can sometimes live as though we have despaired of that reality. Perhaps we have fallen into patterns of sin and we no longer believe it is possible to live a life of grace. Perhaps we have sinned in a way that we believe to be beyond the forgiveness of Almighty God. Jesus is the reason for our Hope! He is the reminder of the profound love and desire God has for each of us. His healing of the sick and the sinners is proof that God is always pouring out upon us whatever is necessary for salvation!

May God bless you,
Monsignor Kieran Harrington, V.E.

Monsignor’s Message – Temperance

Posted on Jul 27, 2017

This is a message from Msgr. Kieran Harrington, Vicar for Communications for the Diocese of Brooklyn that appears in The Tablet:

Temperance. Whether small passing thoughts, nagging suggestions, or a strong, seemingly overwhelming desire to do what we know is wrong—we all encounter temptations. Temperance is the virtue to avoid and resist evil suggestions. In the modern era, technology makes it possible to indulge almost every desire we wish. The broader culture embraces a libertine mindset which permits most everything; a false perception of anonymity fuels bad behavior. Temperance is that virtue which prevents our passions from enslaving us. The more we resist sin, the greater our capacity for God’s grace. As we become increasingly free of sin, we grow in the confidence that God loves us, and more importantly, that we love Him in return. This is what it means to become holy. Let us seek to cultivate the virtue of temperance by avoiding those occasions of sin. By making a daily examination of conscience and going to confession regularly, as well as adhering to a plan of life, we can cultivate the virtue of temperance.

May God Bless you,
Monsignor Kieran Harrington, V.E.

Monsignor’s Message – Justice

Posted on Jul 21, 2017

This is a message from Msgr. Kieran Harrington, Vicar for Communications for the Diocese of Brooklyn that appears in The Tablet:

Justice. To give each one his/her due is how we might describe justice. That seems very reasonable but the sticking point is always: what is one’s due? We might begin by asking what is due to God? In the Holy Mass we lift up our hearts to the Lord – It is Right and Just. God deserves honor and worship from His creation. In a real sense, God deserves our all. Discussions of justice always involve rights. There are primary rights, foundational to who we are as human beings, and secondary rights subject to sometimes changing circumstances. Often we fail to distinguish between these different types of rights. If we strive to be more just in our dealing with others and less concerned about if we are being treated “fairly,” we will grow in the virtue of acting justly.

May God bless you,
Monsignor Kieran Harrington, V.E.

Monsignor’s Message – Independence Day

Posted on Jun 29, 2017

This is a message from Msgr. Kieran Harrington, Vicar for Communications for the Diocese of Brooklyn that appears in The Tablet:

The America experiment began 241 years ago. Our founding fathers discerned that all human beings have certain natural rights that were bestowed upon us, not from a monarch or government, but from Almighty God. This assertion of inalienable rights and the corresponding claim of national sovereignty placed our fledgling nation on a path to war with Great Britain. Blood was spilled and a nation was born. As we celebrate our national independence, let us never forget the risk and sacrifice of our forefathers. May God grant us the same courage as we confront the particular challenges we face in the modern era.

May God bless you,
Monsignor Kieran Harrington, V.E.

Monsignor’s Message – Corpus Christi Sunday

Posted on Jun 15, 2017

This is a message from Msgr. Kieran Harrington, Vicar for Communications for the Diocese of Brooklyn that appears in The Tablet:

Corpus Christi Sunday is one of my favorite celebrations in the liturgical calendar. In a mystical way, at each Mass, we stand beside Christ at Calvary. Not all Christians share this belief. Baptists, Pentecostals, and non-denominational churches are all non-liturgical communities. These services are a mixture of scripture and preaching, prayer and praise. The charismatic nature of these worships is appealing to many. The focus is on the experience of the worshipper. Catholics, Orthodox churches, Lutherans, and Episcopalians all belong to liturgical communities. We all place an emphasis on Eucharistic celebrations. Our worships are very similar. Despite these similarities in worships, the theological differences are significant. By the laying of hands, our priests act in the person of Christ – the Head of the Church – and they represent for us the saving acts of Christ. The power of the words of our Lord manifested as His own Body and Blood upon the Altar. Saint Thomas Aquinas explained that even as the chemical composition is the same (accident), the underlying reality (substance) is now the Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ. How can we fail in gratitude to worship so great a mystery?

May God bless you,
Monsignor Kieran Harrington, V.E.

Monsignor’s Message – Most Holy Trinity

Posted on Jun 7, 2017

This is a message from Msgr. Kieran Harrington, Vicar for Communications for the Diocese of Brooklyn that appears in The Tablet:

The Holy Trinity is a mystery and all mysteries elude our grasp. Just when we have an insight that leads to some understanding, deeper questions emerge. For me, what is central about the Trinity is relationships. We believe in one God. Yet, God is in relationship — God is Father, Son and Spirit. This relation is not a relationship of rivals, but of love. This love is not sterile, but generative. We human beings who are created in the image and likeness of our creator might consider, on this feast of the Most Holy Trinity, the quality of our relationships. Do our relationships give life or drain life? Are they manipulative or free? Do we become selfish or are we more selfless? On this feast day, perhaps we might consider how our relationships resemble or disfigure this image of the Trinity.

May God bless you,
Monsignor Kieran Harrington, V.E.

Monsignor’s Message – Feast of the Ascension

Posted on May 26, 2017

This is a message from Msgr. Kieran Harrington, Vicar for Communications for the Diocese of Brooklyn that appears in The Tablet:

The feast of the Ascension marks a moment of transition in time. In Lent and Easter we have celebrated the saving works of Christ. Now, the inspiration of the Holy Spirit assists us in understanding how the salvation won for us by Jesus is being worked out in the world and our lives. We are unafraid! Yet the devil remains determined to undermine faith by stoking flames of fear. The evil one deploys his weapons skillfully. The manipulation of religious faith to extremism and terrorism in order to spread fear is but one weapon in his arsenal. We have witnessed that most recently with a suicide bombing in England. So what is the response of a person of faith? It is the example of Pope Francis who traveled to Egypt despite the violence there against Christians, and walked amid the people to remind them to be courageous. Christ has indeed ascended to the Father, but He has not left us orphans. Indeed, He sent us a powerful Advocate: the Holy Spirit. We are convinced, and thus fearless that by His power, the Accuser Satan will be cast out! May God bless you.

May God bless you,
Monsignor Kieran Harrington, V.E.

Monsignor’s Message – The Passing of Bishop Thomas Daily

Posted on May 18, 2017

This is a message from Msgr. Kieran Harrington, Vicar for Communications for the Diocese of Brooklyn that appears in The Tablet:

This past week, we mourn the passing of Bishop Thomas Vose Daily, the sixth Bishop of Brooklyn. Bishop Daily displayed in his office a picture of himself as a young priest surrounded by poor children in Peru, while spending five years in the Missionary Society of St. James the Apostle. He told me this was his favorite picture. He was, in his heart, a missionary. When Bishop Daily left Palm Beach for Rockaway Beach, it said a lot about the man. As Bishop of Brooklyn, he loved to spend time in the Farragut Housing Projects, knocking on doors and inviting people to come back to the Church. He was committed to the dignity of every human life, and it is no wonder that each Saturday he could be found outside doors of abortion clinics praying for the women contemplating having an abortion. Bishop Daily was born into privilege. His family was wealthy and established. He preferred, however, to be with the poor and vulnerable because that is where Christ could be found. Rest in peace, Thomas Vose Daily, a priest and apostle of Jesus Christ.

May God bless you,
Monsignor Kieran Harrington, V.E.